Spacer
Spacer
Phytosanitary Alert System Logo
Spacer
    Home     |     Emerging Pest Alerts    |     Official Pest Reports    |     Archive    |     Resources
Spacer
Print This Page
Official Pest Reports

Official Pest Reports are provided by National Plant Protection Organizations within the NAPPO region. These Pest Reports are intended to comply with the International Plant Protection Convention's Standard on Pest Reporting, endorsed by the Interim Commission on Phytosanitary Measures in March 2002.

USA Flag Spondias spp. and other fruits
Date posted: 04/22/2011
Contact: Tony Roman, Import Specialist at (301) 734-5820, or Juan.A.Roman@aphis.usda.gov
APHIS has determined that the introduction and establishment of Anastrepha obliqua poses a serious threat to United States agriculture including certain fruits or vegetables grown in the United States. Fruits of Spondias spp., Malphighia glabra L. (Barbados cherry), Averrhoa carambolas L. (Carambola), Flacourtia indica (Governor's plum), Manilkara zapota (L.) P. Royen (Sapodilla) and Passiflora spp. (Passion fruit including granadilla) from St. Vincent and the Grenadines have been allowed into the United States since 1987. Due to the introduction of A. obliqua to St. Vincent and the Grenadines, APHIS has decided to suspend the importation of these fruits from St. Vincent and the Grenadines because APHIS has determined that the introduction and establishment of A. obliqua poses a serious threat to United States agriculture.

Currently, the only APHIS approved treatment for A. obliqua in Spondias spp. Barbados cherry, passion fruit, carambola and sapodilla is irradiation as stated in 7 CFR 305 (Carambola also can be treated with cold treatment). Therefore, for importation into the United States, these fruits from St. Vincent and the Grenadines must be treated in accordance with 7 CFR 305. Currently St. Vincent and the Grenadines does not meet all of the requirements of 7 CFR 305. Until all of these requirements are met, irradiation is not an option.

Under IPPC standards, Anastrepha obliqua is considered to be a pest that is absent: eradicated from Cameron County, Texas in the United States.

Spacer
     Subscribe    |     About Us    |     Comments    |     Collaborators Only    |     Pestalert.org en Español
To view PDF's on this site - download the Adobe Reader.
Logo
Copyright © 2000-2017.
NSF Center for Integrated Pest Management